To celebrate Connecticut College’s 100th Convocation, we’ve pulled together some material from the College’s first convocation on October 9, 1915.

The official “opening” of the new College, the festive occasion was marked with a procession led by the town band, the conferral of an honorary degree on college benefactor Morton Plant, speeches by a dozen or so college presidents, a ceremonial raising of the national flag, and a public inspection of the new buildings. 

Frederick Sykes even invited President Woodrow Wilson to take part. Though Wilson was unable to attend, he sent a letter offering his sincere congratulations in reply.

Now that the entire 99-year run of our college newspaper is up in Digital Commons, we’re turning our attention to the Connecticut College Alumni Magazine. First published in 1924 as the Connecticut College Alumnae Annual, the alumni magazine continues today as CC: Magazine. We’re up through 1935, and are adding issues weekly - check them out at http://digitalcommons.conncoll.edu/alumnews/.

Now that the entire 99-year run of our college newspaper is up in Digital Commons, we’re turning our attention to the Connecticut College Alumni Magazine. First published in 1924 as the Connecticut College Alumnae Annual, the alumni magazine continues today as CC: Magazine. We’re up through 1935, and are adding issues weekly - check them out at http://digitalcommons.conncoll.edu/alumnews/.

When he was rejected by the Union army in 1861, Cornelius Gold took to the sea, booking passage on a cargo ship bound for Hong Kong. Halfway through his passage on the Oriental, he became a member of the crew, then served on the Jabez Snow with a load of cargo from China to Liverpool. For the 16 months of his adventure, he kept a journal recording position and weather, cultural contacts, and messy disasters involving barrels of molasses. The end result of Gold’s adventures was new strength in body and spirit, such that he could be drafted into the Connecticut infantry after his return home in 1863.

In 1861, Cornelius Gold, a young man from Washington, Connecticut and former student of the abolitionist Frederick Gunn tried to enlist in the Union Army. He was turned down because of his frail health. Undaunted, he went on a months long sea voyage on several cargo ships to the Far East, England, and back home. Upon returning to Connecticut, Gold was drafted into the army and joined the 6th Connecticut Infantry. He would serve for a year in the 6th, mostly on Hilton Head and in the Petersburg Campaign, before gaining a transfer to the Navy, where he was a paymaster in the Gulf of Mexico for another year. 

We have now processed a collection of 50 letters, most of them written by Cornelius to his family in Connecticut, but including two very interesting letters from letters from his friend Romulus Loveridge, a lieutenant with one of the African-American regiments fighting for the Union cause. In researching the life of Cornelius Gold, we happened across a journal he kept on his sea voyage being offered by a manuscripts dealer. We are happy to announce that it will soon be joining the collection. 

A description of the collection and finding aid may be found at http://collections.conncoll.edu/gold/.

Like many residential college campuses in the Northeast, Connecticut College is known for its Gothic-style architecture. In the 1950s and 60s, however, the College built a series of new buildings with a decidedly Modernist bent to help accommodate a growing student body and an increasingly collaborative, socially-focused curriculum.

We love these photos of modern interiors from Crozier-Williams (1958), the North Complex of dormitories (1963), and Lazrus House (1964).

Errol Flynn - star of stage and screen, swashbuckling action hero … and one-time Connecticut College applicant?
On October 20, 1948, Director of Admissions Robert Cobbledick received a letter from Beverly Hills attorney Robert E. Ford, inquiring about the possibility of enrolling an unnamed male client in a course or two on history or philosophy. The possibility wasn’t unheard of - Connecticut College had enrolled the occasional male student since the late 1930s - and Cobbledick responded in kind, though he did suggest that unless the circumstances were “distinctly unusual,” the client would perhaps be better suited at a co-educational or male institution.
A few days later, Ford sent another inquiry - the unnamed client was none other than the actor, Errol Flynn. Flynn made a number of inquiries to New England colleges by the sea, hoping to live off his boat while he attended classes. Unswayed, Cobbledick remained firm in his refusal, and suggested Flynn instead apply to the University of Bridgeport. 

Errol Flynn - star of stage and screen, swashbuckling action hero … and one-time Connecticut College applicant?

On October 20, 1948, Director of Admissions Robert Cobbledick received a letter from Beverly Hills attorney Robert E. Ford, inquiring about the possibility of enrolling an unnamed male client in a course or two on history or philosophy. The possibility wasn’t unheard of - Connecticut College had enrolled the occasional male student since the late 1930s - and Cobbledick responded in kind, though he did suggest that unless the circumstances were “distinctly unusual,” the client would perhaps be better suited at a co-educational or male institution.

A few days later, Ford sent another inquiry - the unnamed client was none other than the actor, Errol Flynn. Flynn made a number of inquiries to New England colleges by the sea, hoping to live off his boat while he attended classes. Unswayed, Cobbledick remained firm in his refusal, and suggested Flynn instead apply to the University of Bridgeport. 

Connecticut College … for Men?

In the 1950s, local manufacturing and production facilities like Electric Boat, Dow Chemical Corporation, and Pfizer employed large numbers of college-educated men and women in New London and neighboring Groton. Looking for opportunities for their employees to continue their studies on a graduate level, these companies approached Connecticut College in 1959 about the possibility of granting graduate degrees to both men and women.

The College was interested, but its charter specifically restricted the grating of degrees to undergraduate women. Undeterred, the College petitioned the state legislature to charter a separate institution - Connecticut College for Men - in 1959, enabling the institution to grant graduate degrees to both men and women. Connecticut College for Men operated until 1969, when it was incorporated with Connecticut College for Women after the decision to go co-ed was made.

Want to learn more? The Connecticut College for Men Records are recently processed and open for research: http://collections.conncoll.edu/rg28_ccfm/ccfm_fa.html

We recently added several new books to our Artists’ Books Collection by one of our favorite book artists, Jill Timm. Yellowstone Summer has a series of photographs of the park taken in the summer beneath a running quotation from John Muir. Gates is two spiral-bound collections of photos capturing the installation of Christo’s famous Central Park project. Water Rush is a unique structure, containing reversible images each side of a flag book. These three books (plus River D, not show here) join a very strong collection, one of the most popular in the Lear Center for teaching and exhibitions.

In the midst of processing over 30,000 campus photographs, we sometimes turn up gems like this:
President Charles Shain wards off an attack by Valkyries Warrine Eastburn (Dean of Administration) and Alice Johnson (Dean of Freshmen) during a faculty show on May 5, 1964.
Collection: Theater Department records, 1915-2014

In the midst of processing over 30,000 campus photographs, we sometimes turn up gems like this:

President Charles Shain wards off an attack by Valkyries Warrine Eastburn (Dean of Administration) and Alice Johnson (Dean of Freshmen) during a faculty show on May 5, 1964.

Collection: Theater Department records, 1915-2014

Robert Fregosi was working for New York Life when the United States entered World War II. Like many of his contemporaries, he volunteered in 1942, lying about his age to gain admission to the Army Air Corps. After nearly a year and a half of training, he joined the 390th Bombardment Group in the 8th Air Force flying as a bombardier in a B-17. Fregosi flew dozens of missions over Europe and developed a reputation for uncanny accuracy. He even drew a letter of commendation from a Luftwaffe officer for a bombing run that destroyed a German rail yard while sparing the hospital and Romanesque cathedral on either side. 

The Lear Center has a collection of records, correspondence, photographs, and clippings documenting Fregosi’s service. Pictured here are the crew of Fregosi’s plane, the Decatur Deb, with Lt. Fregosi in the back row on the left; Fregosi’s flight log for May, 1944, during which time he flew several missions over France, Belgium, and Germany; and Fregosi’s award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for his actions in the runup to the Normandy landings on June 6, 1944.